Javascript is disabled. Please enable javascript to view images and advanced functionality
Social MediaSummary
Did You Mean: Iota-carrageenaseKappa-carrageenase

Add research to Carrageenan by attaching materials such as relevant webpages, videos, images or pdf documents here

0%

Carrageenan on Social Media

Carrageenan Summary

Binding food additive made from seaweed

Carrageenan

Carrageenans or carrageenins ( karr-ə-gee-nənz, from Irish carraigín, "little rock") are a family of linear sulfated polysaccharides that are extracted from red edible seaweeds. They are widely used in the food industry, for their gelling, thickening, and stabilizing properties. Their main application is in dairy and meat products, due to their strong binding to food proteins. There are three main varieties of carrageenan, which differ in their degree of sulfation. Kappa-carrageenan has one sulfate group per disaccharide, iota-carrageenan has two, and lambda-carrageenan has three. Gelatinous extracts of the Chondrus crispus (Irish moss) seaweed have been used as food additives since approximately the fifteenth century. Carrageenan is a vegetarian and vegan alternative to gelatin in some applications or may be used to replace gelatin in confectionery.

Website Menu