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Did You Mean: Cofactor (biochemistry)Coenzyme Q10Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide

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Coenzyme Summary

Coenzyme, notable for its role in the synthesis and oxidation of fatty acids, and the oxidation of pyruvate in the citric acid cycle

Coenzyme A also known as CoA   CoASH   HSCoA  

Coenzyme A (CoA, SCoA, CoASH) is a coenzyme, notable for its role in the synthesis and oxidation of fatty acids, and the oxidation of pyruvate in the citric acid cycle. All genomes sequenced to date encode enzymes that use coenzyme A as a substrate, and around 4% of cellular enzymes use it (or a thioester) as a substrate. In humans, CoA biosynthesis requires cysteine, pantothenate (vitamin B5), and adenosine triphosphate (ATP).In its acetyl form, coenzyme A is a highly versatile molecule, serving metabolic functions in both the anabolic and catabolic pathways. Acetyl-CoA is utilised in the post-translational regulation and allosteric regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase and carboxylase to maintain and support the partition of pyruvate synthesis and degradation.

2-Mercaptoethanol3'-Phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulfate4'-phosphopantetheine5,10-MethylenetetrahydrofolateAbsorbanceAcetoacetyl-CoAAcetyl-CoAAcetyl-CoA carboxylaseAcylAcyl-CoA
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